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IOCs

Netwire is an advanced RAT — it is a malware that takes control of infected PCs and allows its operators to perform various actions. Unlike many RATs, this one can target every major operating system, including Windows, Linux, and MacOS.

Trojan
Type
ex-USSR territory
Origin
1 January, 2012
First seen
17 July, 2024
Last seen
Also known as
Recam

How to analyze Netwire with ANY.RUN

Type
ex-USSR territory
Origin
1 January, 2012
First seen
17 July, 2024
Last seen

IOCs

IP addresses
185.140.53.144
23.95.88.13
190.123.44.137
43.226.229.43
185.82.202.154
213.152.162.170
109.232.227.133
213.152.162.94
213.152.162.109
213.152.161.211
213.152.162.89
37.233.101.73
213.152.161.35
109.232.227.138
213.152.180.5
213.152.162.104
199.249.230.27
212.193.30.230
178.159.4.20
67.215.9.235
Hashes
9d452fc3da6b8d8e9cd66317abb299b59630a921918f667bc8f64874a485527a
3c63068f0ff7610cbe73267e9d3c8a4adc977c9fae26f39808d2880f9c79e204
8688f544cabfd78cad749293c52fbdd8ecd8a8fe3716d995e0836b2454d341b2
e01a06a90d6b13e74ef15ccfa198040e90e5e9eeef596e12ad75d7f92797123f
96e7a5d7f7f4517faee06252d3e1cac63f0fb790107afde081d2fd621349fd33
012622e521dee6e1c74c6796c92f1b5d31dda65f11e81c095340ca5ec22bdc3e
defe5a24ac909cc14b06b49ea8574ee1bc964569bf1d18d56d3dd4398daffcde
f2d91d08e7792bad4870697a9668a8b8ae574304a66f19fd4c84baa7c627b092
4aee6fa588692eb4735fbe7f13c643daefc23a10a0a64820e1d307501c548c55
6eb5d9dcf0f31ae42154c514b72cbb8ad73cc0c2101bd35139cffea516c0e7e9
0eccf232a43c8e5a66d70dcc52cfdf5756145777d4e8c9322225e8a79eb8eb1e
85e8c923778743576884ef91502873590a7d6ae7675c526fbad2418091685bc0
61722636c5cad31d212e7ea1da55d4fde3a7e93fc46f81484dd7597a684a8164
4aa0f364e3fda3d7663cac5a3d562786fc3ddbc1c435047f7d3e46f0ff1191b1
3ebd7d66156aaa245f6d6f3e33bf3f453e1cfe4c15f65eeb222ddd20384a13f1
71a260b79d48bfb8917050a14b955f79412846d10f1263ce3ad8ef14f8e07e04
830f73cf5e1d5b9fe22cb2c9053cd40f3f71b96fbe72ff1d087b4924a73bb84b
2cc26f492feded508b95b934e98fac19fb073f24d20bb647c064d06baa7ce070
791667a955fb3cb2833edfc35880b557cf53f9ecba41ac96172606b934e982ba
5c49bfd97ea20083080e81c025dbbc5bafdeadf692de79cba059442a2c0bf8b6
Domains
tamerimia.ug
vbchjfssdfcxbcver.ru
pentester0.accesscam.org
wealthyme.ddns.net
wealthy2019.com.strangled.net
popupcalls.ddns.net
harold.ns01.info
neease.net
haija.mine.nu
alice2019.myftp.biz
86t7b9br9.ddns.net
netwire2021.duckdns.org
stylaksiarra.ddns.net
futerty.mooo.com
tartful.hopto.org
fartgul.duckdns.org
fratful.dynu.net
dunlop.hopto.org
winx.xcapdatap.capetown
emberluck.duckdns.org
Last Seen at

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What is Netwire RAT?

Netwire is a remote access trojan-type malware. A RAT is malware used to control an infected machine remotely. This particular RAT can perform over 100 malicious actions on infected machines and can attack multiple systems, including Windows, Apple’s MacOS, and Linux.

Netwire malware is available for purchase on the darknet in the underground hacking communities, where attackers can buy this RAT for the price of 40 to 140 USD. In addition, Netwire can be purchased on the surface internet for a price of 180 USD. Notably, in 2016 Netwire received an update that added the functionality to steal data from devices connected to the infected machine, such as USB credit card readers, allowing Netwire to perform POS attacks.

General description of Netwire RAT

Netwire Trojan core functionality allows this malware to take remote control of infected PCs, record keyboard strokes and mouse behavior, take screenshots, check system information, and create fake HTTP proxies.

The keylogger functionally allows Netwire to record various personal data imputed on a computer connected to the internet or a corporate network. Combined with the ability to steal credit card information and operate undetected for extended periods of time, Netwire RAT is truly capable of inflicting serious dangers to organizations.

In some malicious campaigns, the Netwire trojan was used to target healthcare and banking businesses. The malware was also documented as being used by a group of scammers from Africa who utilized Netwire to take remote control of infected machines.

Netwire RAT creators have put in a lot of work to ensure that researchers have a hard time analyzing this malware, as many precautions are taken to complicate the research process, including techniques like multiple data encryption layers and string obfuscation. In addition, the malware uses a custom C2 binary protocol that is also encrypted, and so is the relevant data before transmission.

During one campaign, researchers have observed Netwire being distributed as “TeamViewer 10” – named so in an effort to trick victims into thinking that they have downloaded the legitimate remote assistance software. Once the execution process began, this version would drop an .EXE file and start establishing persistence right away. The malware created a Windows shortcut in the Startup menu to ensure that the Netwire trojan would always run when the user logged into the system. Interestingly, another trick designed to keep the malware hidden actually gave it away during this particular campaign. The malware would inject its code into the Notepad.exe, unveiling its presence since it’s not normal for the notepad to have an always active network connection. Only after decoding the data prepared for transmission to the C2, the sensitive nature of the stolen information was discovered. Unfortunately, researches did not reveal what the organization was targeted in this particular attack.

Netwire RAT malware analysis

A video simulation recorded on ANY.RUN enables researchers to study the lifecycle of the Netwire in a lot of detail and works like a tutorial.

process graph of the Netwire execution Figure 1: Process graph generated by ANY.RUN allows visualizing the life cycle of Netwire

a text report of a netwire analysis Figure 2: A text report generated by ANY.RUN is a great tool to share the research results

Netwire RAT execution process

Netwire isn't as exciting as some other malicious programs can be as far as malware execution goes. It makes its way into the device, mostly in the form of a payload.

The user receives a spam email with an attached Microsoft Word file. After the user downloads and opens this file, the executable is dropped or downloaded onto the machine. After that, the executable starts performing the main malicious activity such as writing itself in autorun, connecting to C2 servers, and stealing information from an infected device. Netwire also has the ability to inject into unsuspicious processes from which it can perform malicious activities.

Distribution of Netwire RAT

Netwire RAT is usually being distributed in email phishing campaigns in the form of a malicious Microsoft Office document. The victim must enable macros for the RAT to enter an active state. The macros then proceed to download Netwire, allowing the malware to start the execution process.

How to export Netwire data using ANY.RUN?

If analysts want to do additional work with events from tasks or share them with colleagues for tutorials, they can export to different formats. Just click on the "Export" button and choose the most suitable format in the drop-down menu. Export of any kind of malware research is available including Predator the Thief or Qbot.

Export options for netwire malware Figure 3: Export options for netwire malware

Conclusion

Diverse information stealing feature sets combined with the ability to target multiple operating systems and steal data from credit cards used in an infected system make Netwire Trojan a highly dangerous remote access trojan.

Despite its impressive functionality, the malware is fairly accessible, “retailing” on underground forums for as little as 40 dollars in some select cases. The situation is further worsened by the fact that creators of Netwire RAT have implemented several features designed to complicate the analysis as much as possible.

However, researchers can take advantage of interactive malware hunting services, such as ANY.RUN, which allows to influence the simulation at any point and get much purer research results.

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